Along the southern edge of the 45-acre campus of the South Mississippi Regional Center
are three Live Oaks (Quercus Virginiana) registered with Societe Des Arbres (Tree
Society) of the Garden Clubs of Mississippi, Inc., under the auspices of the Long Beach
Garden Club. Records of the trees are kept in the City of Ocean Springs Library Archives
of History. The trees are also registered with the Live Oak Society of the Louisiana
Garden Club Federation, Inc., with records kept at Federation headquarters in
LeCompte, Louisiana.
The E.O. Hunt Live Oak, first registered in 1966 under the name "Happy Oak" by Mrs.
E.O. Hunt, was recertified in 1986 when it was renamed to honor Mr. Hunt. In 1979, the tree was measured by the District
Forester with the Mississippi Forestry Commission and was honored with a "Mississippi Big Tree" certificate as the largest
specimen of its kind in Mississippi as of that date. Since then another live oak, discovered in Pearl river County, surpasses the
dimensions of the E.O. Hunt Live Oak.
In December 1997, the E.O. Hunt Oak was again measured by the District Forester. Based on a formula used to estimate the
age of live oaks, he estimated the age of the trees on the Long Beach campus to be 500 to 550 years old.
Until the autumn of 1997, South Mississippi Regional Center had five registered live oaks on it Long Beach campus. The Harbor
Live Oak, with a trunk circumference of 12.5 feet, was struck by lightning in August and attempts to save the tree were
futile. The Hospitality Oak (trunk circumference 25 feet) on the east side of the campus was known to be weakening and
subsequently fell in September.
The E.O. Hunt Live Oak, a magnificent tree, is the primary motif of the South Mississippi Regional Center logo.
Along the
southern
edge of the
45-acre
campus of
the South
Mississippi Regional Center are three
Live Oaks (Quercus Virginiana)
registered with Societe Des Arbres
(Tree Society) of the Garden Clubs of
Mississippi, Inc., under the auspices
of the Long Beach Garden Club.
Records of the trees are kept in the
City of Ocean Springs Library
Archives of History. The trees are
also registered with the Live Oak
Society of the Louisiana Garden Club
Federation, Inc., with records kept at
Federation headquarters in
LeCompte, Louisiana.
The E.O. Hunt Live Oak, first
registered in 1966 under the name
"Happy Oak" by Mrs. E.O. Hunt, was
recertified in 1986 when it was
renamed to honor Mr. Hunt. In 1979,
the tree was measured by the District
Forester with the Mississippi Forestry
Commission and was honored with a
"Mississippi Big Tree" certificate as
the largest specimen of its kind in
Mississippi as of that date. Since then
another live oak, discovered in Pearl
river County, surpasses the
dimensions of the E.O. Hunt Live
Oak.
In December 1997, the E.O. Hunt Oak
was again measured by the District
Forester. Based on a formula used to
estimate the age of live oaks, he
estimated the age of the trees on the
Long Beach campus to be 500 to 550
years old.
Until the autumn of 1997, South
Mississippi Regional Center had five
registered live oaks on it Long Beach
campus. The Harbor Live Oak, with a
trunk circumference of 12.5 feet,
was struck by lightning in August and
attempts to save the tree were
futile. The Hospitality Oak (trunk
circumference 25 feet) on the east
side of the campus was known to be
weakening and subsequently fell in
September.
The E.O. Hunt Live Oak, a
magnificent tree, is the primary
motif of the South Mississippi
Regional Center logo.
Along the southern edge of the 45-acre campus
of the South Mississippi Regional Center are
three Live Oaks (Quercus Virginiana) registered
with Societe Des Arbres (Tree Society) of the
Garden Clubs of Mississippi, Inc., under the
auspices of the Long Beach Garden Club.
Records of the trees are kept in the City of
Ocean Springs Library Archives of History. The
trees are also registered with the Live Oak
Society of the Louisiana Garden Club
Federation, Inc., with records kept at Federation headquarters in LeCompte,
Louisiana.
The E.O. Hunt Live Oak, first registered in 1966 under the name "Happy Oak" by Mrs.
E.O. Hunt, was recertified in 1986 when it was renamed to honor Mr. Hunt. In 1979,
the tree was measured by the District Forester with the Mississippi Forestry
Commission and was honored with a "Mississippi Big Tree" certificate as the largest
specimen of its kind in Mississippi as of that date. Since then another live oak,
discovered in Pearl river County, surpasses the dimensions of the E.O. Hunt Live
Oak.
In December 1997, the E.O. Hunt Oak was again measured by the District Forester.
Based on a formula used to estimate the age of live oaks, he estimated the age of
the trees on the Long Beach campus to be 500 to 550 years old.
Until the autumn of 1997, South Mississippi Regional Center had five registered live
oaks on it Long Beach campus. The Harbor Live Oak, with a trunk circumference of
12.5 feet, was struck by lightning in August and attempts to save the tree were
futile. The Hospitality Oak (trunk circumference 25 feet) on the east side of the
campus was known to be weakening and subsequently fell in September.
The E.O. Hunt Live Oak, a magnificent tree, is the primary motif of the South
Mississippi Regional Center logo.
SMRC: Registered Live Oaks
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